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What You Need to Know About Yielding As A Driver in California

Drivers end up yielding the right of way to others just about every time they get behind the wheel of their vehicles. However, even though yielding is something that regularly occurs, do you know what the law actually says about yielding in California?

Here, we want to give you the information you need to know about yielding the right of way in California. 

What the Law Says About Yielding

When we examine Vehicle Code Sections 21800-21804, we see that there are various codes that make it illegal to fail to yield to other motorists when required by law. These various sections of California code typically apply to intersections and situations where drivers enter a highway or make left-hand turns.

  • Vehicle Code 21800 (a) CVC. This specifies that drivers entering an intersection are required to yield to any vehicles already in the intersection.
  • Vehicle Code 21800 (b)(1) CVC. This specifies that if two vehicles enter into an intersection at the same time, the vehicle on the left must yield to the one on the right.
  • Vehicle Code 21800 (c) CVC. This law states that if two vehicles enter an intersection controlled by stop signs at the same time, the driver on the left needs to yield to the driver on the right.
  • Vehicle Code 21800 (d)(1) CVC. This states that drivers must stop when approaching intersections if the traffic signals are not working.
  • Vehicle Code 21800 (d)(2) CVC. This code says that if two vehicles enter an intersection at the same time and the signals are malfunctioning, the driver on the left must yield to the driver on the right.
  • Vehicle Code 21801 CVC. This says that drivers turning left or completing a U-turn have to yield to drivers coming from the opposite direction.
  • Vehicle Code 21802 CVC. This states that drivers must stop at intersections with stop signs to yield to vehicles already in the intersection.
  • Vehicle Code 21803 CVC. This says that motorists entering an intersection with a yield sign must yield to other drivers in the intersection.
  • Vehicle Code 21804 CVC. This states that drivers needing to enter a highway must yield to all approaching traffic already on the highway.

Codes related to failing to yield to emergency vehicles and failing to yield to pedestrians are addressed in other sections of California code.

Yielding is Important – What Happens if You Don’t

Just about every driver will yield when they get on the roadway, even if they are only driving up the street to the store. Unfortunately, many individuals fail to understand when they are required to yield by law, or there are times when people are simply in a hurry and choose to violate the law.

Drivers who violate these sections of the law for failing to yield could face a few consequences. First, if the driver is pulled over by police for failing to yield, they could face a fine of $238 as well as one point assessed against the DMV driving record for that driver.

In the event a person fails to yield the right of way and this causes an accident, it is very likely that the driver who failed to yield will be found completely or partially responsible for the incident. This would lead to them having to pay compensation to the other driver or drivers involved. Speak to a Riverside accident attorney today to learn more.